Consumer research for older and disabled people

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Trailers for wheelchairs and scooters

Loading scooter on to trailer
Scooter Trailer from G Bernard Elliott

The main advantages of a trailer are that you don't have to fold or dismantle your wheelchair, and you still have use of your car's boot. Trailers can take large scooters with ease. A full car driving licence allows you to tow a trailer if the weight of the trailer and its load is not more than 750kg.

Using a trailer will make it awkward to reverse, and since they protrude well behind the vehicle you may find parking difficult. You'll also need to find a considerable amount of space to unload a standard trailer; a trailer whose bed swivels can make this less of a problem.

When you are towing, there is a 60mph speed limit on dual carriageways and motorways and 50mph on single carriageways (unless lower speed limits apply locally). You must not travel in the right-hand lane on motorways. You will need insurance for the trailer and for the wheelchair.

Trailers need to have a light, indicators and number plate, if the number plate on the vehicle cannot be seen from 6m away with the trailer in place. A few cars cannot be fitted with a tow bar - check with the car's maker or a tow-bar fitter.

Overview of the trailers available

Here we give information about a specially designed scooter trailer. Other, non-specialist trailers are available - talk to your garage or motoring supplier about your requirements.

Scooter Trailer

Scooter TrailerPrice: from £775
Maximum load (kg): 250/400
Platform length (mm): 1525/1675
Platform width (mm): 760/915
Distributed by: G Bernard Elliott

  • two-wheeled trailer with fold-up ramp at the rear
  • trailer platform can be rotated 90 degrees, so you can roll the chair on to the kerb without unhooking the trailer
  • jockey wheel to make trailer easier to turn
  • lights supplied
  • rain cover not supplied

Last updated: September 2010


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